Undergraduate Courses

Biochemistry and Biophysics (BIOL 101)

The study of life at the molecular level. Topics include the three-dimensional structures and function of large biological molecules, the human genome, and the design of antiviral drugs to treat HIV/AIDS.

The first of four modules in a yearlong foundational biology sequence; meets for the first half of the term.

Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Spring , Term: Fall

Cell Bio & Membrane Physiology (BIOL 102)

The study of cell biology and membrane physiology. Topics include organization and functional properties of biological membranes, membrane physiology and signaling, rough endoplasmic reticulum and synthesis of membrane/secretory membrane proteins, endocytosis, the cytoskeleton, and cell division.

The second of four modules in a yearlong foundational biology sequence; meets for the second half of the term. Prerequisite: BIOL 101.

Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Spring , Term: Fall

Genes and Development (BIOL 103)

Foundation principles for the study of genes, genetics, and developmental biology. How genes control development and disease; Mendel’s rules; examples of organ physiology.

The third of four modules in a yearlong foundational biology sequence; meets for the first half of the term. Prerequisites: BIOL 101, 102

Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Spring , Term: Fall

Ecology & Evolutionary Biology (BIOL 104)

The study of evolutionary biology, animal behavior, and the history of life. Evolutionary transitions and natural selection. Adaptation at genic, chromosomal, cellular, organismal, and supra-organismal levels. Distributional and social consequences of particular suites of organismal adaptations.

The fourth of four modules in a yearlong foundational biology sequence; meets for the second half of the term. Prerequisites: BIOL 101, 102, and 103.

Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Spring , Term: Fall

The Ecology of Food (E&EB 035)

Food and ecology are inextricably linked, both in the production of domesticated food through agriculture and livestock, and in the harvesting of wild plants and animals. Furthermore, the production and consumption of food has downstream consequences through energy consumption, food waste, trophic interactions and the transportation of food around the globe. These topics link to many of the fundamental concepts of ecology, including population biology, the niche, trophic interactions, nitrogen cycling and the effects on biodiversity. In this class we explore each of these topics intensively through a combination of lectures, readings and interactive field trips to local ecosystems, the Marsh and Yale Biology Building greenhouses, the Yale Sustainable Farm, and local food producers. The course meets twice a week: for 50 minutes for a combination of lecture and discussion, and for 110 minutes for field trips and guest lectures.
1 Yale College course credit(s)

Professor: Linda Puth
Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Fall 2020
Day/Time: M 1.30-2.20 , W 1.30-3.20

The Evolution of Beauty (E&EB 050)

Exploration of the fundamental mechanism of sexual selection and mate choice, and the patterns of display trait and mating preference coevolution. Additional topics include what happens when the freedom of mate choice is infringed or disrupted by sexual coercion or sexual violence; and the role of aesthetic evolution and sexual conflict in the evolution of human sexuality, pleasure, and sexual diversity. Enrollment limited to freshmen.

Preregistration required; see under Frist Year Seminar Program.

Professor: Richard Prum
Course Type: Undergraduate

Virus Discovery and Evolution Lab (E&EB 075L)

An introduction to empirical research with a hybrid between lab exercises and mentored research on bacteriophage, which are viruses that infect bacteria. A general goal of this course is for each student to decide whether they want to continue with undergraduate research. Specific learning objectives and assessments focus on experimental design, hypothesis testing, data analysis, and presentation. Students will practice these skills and conduct independent research projects. Students will gain basic experience with methods and principles from microbiology, genetics, ecology, and evolutionary biology.

Enrollment limited to first-year students. Preregistration required; see under First-Year Seminar Program.

1 Yale College course credit(s)

Professor: Alita Burmeister
Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Spring 2021
Day/Time: Th 1:00pm - 5:00pm

Biology of Malaria, Lyme and Other Vector Borne Disease (E&EB 106 )

ntroduction to the biology of pathogen transmission from one organism to another by insects; special focus on malaria, dengue, and Lyme disease. Biology of the pathogens including modes of transmission, establishment of infection, and immune responses; the challenges associated with vector control, prevention, development of vaccines, and treatments.

Intended for non–science majors; preference to freshmen and sophomores. Prerequisite: high school biology.

1 Yale College course credit(s)

Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Fall 2020
Day/Time: MW 1.00pm -2.15pm

Conservation Biology (E&EB 115/515)

An introduction to ecological and evolutionary principles underpinning efforts to conserve Earth’s biodiversity. Efforts to halt the rapid increase in disappearance of both plants and animals. Discussion of sociological and economic issues.

1 Yale College course credit(s)

Professor: Linda Puth
Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Fall 2020
Day/Time: MW 10.30-11.20, 1 HTBA

History of Life (E&EB 125)

Examination of fossil and geologic evidence pertaining to the origin, evolution, and history of life on Earth. Emphasis on major events in the history of life, on what the fossil record reveals about the evolutionary process, on the diversity of ancient and living organisms, and on the evolutionary impact of Earth’s changing environment.

1 Yale College course credit(s)

Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Spring 2021
Day/Time: TTh 11.35am -12.50pm

Plants and People (E&EB 145)

The interaction of plants and people throughout history explored from biological, historical, anthropological, and artistic perspectives. Basic botany; plants in the context of agriculture; plants as instruments of trade and societal change; plants as inspiration; plants in the environment. Includes field trips to the greenhouses at Yale Marsh Botanical Garden, the Yale Peabody Museum and Herbarium, the Yale Farm, and the Yale Art Gallery.

1 Yale College course credit(s)

Professor: Linda Puth
Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Spring 2021
Day/Time: MWF 10.30am -11.20am

Introduction to Statistics: Life Sciences (E&EB 210)

Statistical and probabilistic analysis of biological problems, presented with a unified foundation in basic statistical theory. Problems are drawn from genetics, ecology, epidemiology, and bioinformatics.

1 Yale College course credit(s)

Professor: Walter Jetz
Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Fall 2020
Day/Time: TTh 1:00pm -2:15pm

General Ecology (E&EB 220/520)

The theory and practice of ecology, including the ecology of individuals, population dynamics and regulation, community structure, ecosystem function, and ecological interactions at broad spatial and temporal scales. Topics such as climate change, fisheries management, and infectious diseases are placed in an ecological context.

Prerequisite: MATH 112 or equivalent.

1 Yale College course credit(s)

Professor: David Vasseur, Professor: David Post
Course Type: Undergraduate, Course Type: Graduate
Term: Fall 2020
Day/Time: MWF 10:30am -11:20am

Laboratory for Principles of Ecology, Evolutionary Biology, and the Tree of Life (E&EB 223L/523L)

Study of evolutionary novelties, their functional morphology, and their role in the diversity of life. Introduction to techniques used for studying the diversity of animal body plans. Evolutionary innovations that have allowed groups of organisms to increase their diversity.

0.5 Yale College course credit(s)

Professor: Marta Wells
Course Type: Undergraduate, Course Type: Graduate
Term: Spring 2021
Day/Time: TWTh 1:30pm - 4:30pm

Evolutionary Biology (E&EB 225/525)

An overview of evolutionary biology as the discipline uniting all of the life sciences. Reading and discussion of scientific papers to explore the dynamic aspects of evolutionary biology. Principles of population genetics, paleontology, and systematics; application of evolutionary thinking in disciplines such as developmental biology, ecology, microbiology, molecular biology, and human medicine.

1 Yale College course credit(s)

Professor: Paul Turner
Course Type: Undergraduate, Course Type: Graduate
Term: Spring 2021
Day/Time: TTh 10:30am -11:20am, 1 HTBA

Ecology and Evolution of Infectious Disease (E&EB 228/528)

Overview of the ecology and evolution of pathogens (bacteria, viruses, protozoa) and their impact on host populations. Topics include theoretical concepts, ecological and evolutionary dynamics, molecular biology, and epidemiology of ancient and emerging diseases. 

1 Yale College course credit(s)

Professor: Paul Turner
Course Type: Undergraduate, Course Type: Graduate

Field Ecology (E&EB 230/530)

A field-based introduction to ecological research, using experimental and descriptive approaches, comparative analysis, and modeling for field and small-group projects. Weekly field trips explore local lake, salt marsh, rocky intertidal, traprock ridge, and upland forest ecosystems. Includes one Saturday field trip and a three-day trip during the October recess.

Concurrently with or after E&EB 220 or with permission of instructor.

1 Yale College course credit(s)

Professor: Linda Puth
Course Type: Undergraduate, Course Type: Graduate

Plant Diversity & Evolution (E&EB 246/546)

Introduction to the major plant groups and their evolutionary relationships, with an emphasis on the diversification and global importance of flowering plants.

To be taken concurrently with E&EB 247L. Prerequisite: a general understanding of biology and evolution.

1 Yale College course credit(s)

Professor: Erika Edwards
Course Type: Undergraduate, Course Type: Graduate
Day/Time: MW 1:00pm -2:15pm

Laboratory for Plant Diversity & Evolution (E&EB 247L/547L)

Hands-on experience with the plant groups examined in the accompanying lectures. Local field trips.

To be taken concurrently with E&EB 246.

0.5 Yale College course credit(s)

Professor: Erika Edwards
Course Type: Undergraduate, Course Type: Graduate

Biology Of Terrestrial Arthropods (E&EB 250/550)

Evolutionary history and diversity of terrestrial arthropods (body plan, phylogenetic relationships, fossil record); physiology and functional morphology (water relations, thermoregulation, energetics of flying and singing); reproduction (biology of reproduction, life cycles, metamorphosis, parental care); behavior (migration, communication, mating systems, evolution of sociality); ecology (parasitism, mutualism, predator-prey interactions, competition, plant-insect interactions). To be taken concurrently with E&EB 251L.

1 Yale College course credit(s)

Professor: Marta Wells
Course Type: Undergraduate, Course Type: Graduate
Term: Fall 2020
Day/Time: TTh 11:35am -12:50pm

Laboratory for Biology Of Terrestrial Arthropods (E&EB 251L/551L)

Comparative anatomy, dissections, identification, and classification of terrestrial arthropods; specimen collection; field trips.

Concurrently with or after E&EB 250.

0.5 Yale College course credit(s)

Professor: Marta Wells
Course Type: Undergraduate, Course Type: Graduate
Term: Fall 2020
Day/Time: W 1:30pm -4:30pm

Invertebrates I (E&EB 255/555)

An overview of animal diversity that explores themes including animal phylogenetics (evolutionary relationships), comparative studies of evolutionary patterns across species, organism structure and function, and the interaction of organisms with their environments. Most animal lineages are marine invertebrates, so marine invertebrates are the focus of most of the course. E&EB 256L is not required to enroll in the lecture.

1 Yale College course credit(s)

Professor: Casey Dunn
Course Type: Undergraduate, Course Type: Graduate

Laboratory for Invertebrates I (E&EB 256L/556L)

The study of invertebrate anatomy and diversity in a laboratory and field setting. Activities will include will examine live animals and museum specimens, as well as local field trips. Some field trips will fall on weekends. This lab must be taken concurrently with the lecture E&EB 255.

0.5 Yale College course credit(s)

Professor: Casey Dunn
Course Type: Undergraduate, Course Type: Graduate

Ichthyology (E&EB 264/564)

A survey of fish diversity, including jawless vertebrates, chimaeras and sharks, lungfishes, and ray-finned fishes. Topics include the evolutionary origin of vertebrates, the fossil record of fishes, evolutionary diversification of major extant fish lineages, biogeography, ecology, and reproductive strategies of fishes

1 Yale College course credit(s)

Course Type: Undergraduate, Course Type: Graduate

Laboratory for Ichthyology (E&EB 265L/565L)

Laboratory and field studies of fish diversity, form, function, behavior, and classification. The course primarily involves study of museum specimens and of living and fossil fishes.

Concurrently with E&EB 264.

0.5 Yale College course credit(s)

Course Type: Undergraduate, Course Type: Graduate

Ornithology (E&EB 272/672)

An overview of avian biology and evolution, including the structure, function, behavior, and diversity of birds. The evolutionary origin of birds, avian phylogeny, anatomy, physiology, neurobiology, breeding systems, and biogeography.

Enrollment limited to 50.

1 Yale College course credit(s)

Professor: Richard Prum
Course Type: Undergraduate, Course Type: Graduate
Term: Spring 2021
Day/Time: MWF 9:25am -10:15am

Laboratory for Ornithology (E&EB 273L/673L)

Laboratory and field studies of avian morphology, diversity, phylogeny, classification, identification, and behavior.

Enrollment limited to 12.

0.5 Yale College course credit(s)

Professor: Richard Prum
Course Type: Undergraduate, Course Type: Graduate
Term: Spring 2021
Day/Time: T 1:30pm - 4:30pm

Biological Oceanography (E&EB 275)

Exploration of a range of coastal and pelagic ecosystems. Relationships between biological systems and the physical processes that control the movements of water and productivity of marine systems. Anthropogenic impacts on oceans, such as the effects of fishing and climate change. Includes three Friday field trips.

Enrollment limited to 15.

1 Yale College course credit(s)

Professor: Mary Beth Decker
Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Spring 2021
Day/Time: TTh 11:35am -12:50pm

Mammalogy (E&EB 280)

The evolution and diversity of mammals, including primates. Origins, evolutionary history, systematics, morphology, biogeography, physiology, behavior, and ecology of major mammalian lineages. Accompanying laboratories focus on diagnostic morphological features of mammalian groups through examination of specimens from the Peabody Museum.

Professor: Eric Sargis
Course Type: Undergraduate

Comparative Developmental Anatomy of Vertebrates (E&EB 290)

A survey of the development, structure, and evolution of major vertebrate groups. Topics include the micro-anatomy of major organ systems, the developmental underpinnings of the vertebrate body plan, and the development, structure and evolution of the major organ systems such as the locomotory system, sensory organs, digestive tract, reproductive tract, and nervous system.

1 Yale College course credit(s)

Professor: Günter Wagner
Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Spring 2021
Day/Time: MWF 11:35am -12:25pm

Laboratory for Comparative Anatomy of Vertebrates (E&EB 291L)

Microscopic examination of histological and embryological preparations. Dissection of selected vertebrate species including shark, bony fish, frog, lizard, and rat.

To be taken with E&EB 290.

0.5 Yale College course credit(s)

Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Spring 2021
Day/Time: Th 1:30pm -4:30pm, F 1:30pm -4:30pm

Life in Motion: Ecological and Evolutionary Physiology (E&EB 295)

Physiology is the study of the functions that organisms perform and how they use those functions to interact with the environment. To survive, grow, and reproduce, all organisms must acquire energy and avoid conditions that exceed their physiological limits. These interactions all involve motion—ions traveling across membranes, muscle fibers twitching, respiration, and locomotion, to name a few. In this course, we tackle physiological processes from both “bottom up” and “top down” approaches, with integration among these dimensions, to extract general physiological rules of life. Then, we link our discoveries to the broader context of ongoing global change, and consider whether and how organisms can physiologically respond to contemporary selective pressures. While the course focuses heavily on animal physiology, plants, fungi, and microbes are also featured.

Prerequisites: BIOL 101, 102, 103, 104, and CHEM 161, or permission of the instructor.
1 Yale College course credit(s)

Professor: Martha Muñoz
Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Fall 2020
Day/Time: MW 10:30am - 11:20am

Primate Behavior and Ecology (E&EB 300)

Socioecology of primates compared with that of other mammals, emphasizing both general principles and unique primate characteristics. Topics include life-history strategies, feeding ecology, mating systems, and ecological influences on social organization.

Course Type: Undergraduate

Plant Ecology (E&EB 305/705)

The study of plant interactions with their environment, at the level of individuals, and of how plant-plant interactions mediate environmental interactions at the level of populations, communities, and ecosystems. Incorporation of empirical and theoretical perspectives, emphasizing the empirical origins of concepts in plant ecology and effective empirical tests of conceptual and mathematical predictions.

1 Yale College course credit(s)

Professor: Carla Staver
Course Type: Undergraduate, Course Type: Graduate
Day/Time:

Evolutionary Systems Biology (E&EB 310)

Introduction to the evolution of complex biological systems, including metabolism, gene regulatory networks and molecular structure and function. Course includes mathematical modeling and computer simulations of complex adaptive systems.

Prerequisites: MATH 115, BIOL 101, or permission of the instructor.

Professor: Alvaro Sanchez
Course Type: Undergraduate

Advanced Ecology (E&EB 320)

An advanced treatment of ecology, including species interactions, species coexistence theory, species-environment interactions, the maintenance and consequences of biological diversity, spatial ecology, food webs, and eco-evolutionary interactions.

Prerequisites: E&EB 220 and 225, or with permission of instructor.

Professor: David Post
Course Type: Undergraduate

Philosophy of Biology (E&EB 321)

This course is an introduction to the philosophy of biology, with application to specific current problems. It focuses on two major strands of thinking seeking answers to fundamental and complementary questions: “How do we know?” (epistemology) and “What things really exist in the world?” (ontology). These two themes have the most important impact on the practice of science, as they pertain to the nature of the scientific enterprise and how it works (epistemology and philosophy of science), as well as what scientists consider part of reality (=science related ontology: unicorns and phlogiston NO; atoms, electrons, YES; but what about species and genes? Do they have the same status as atoms?). In each of these fields of philosophy we outline the main positions and then discuss how they apply to past and current debates in biology, in particular, but not exclusively, evolutionary biology. Prerequisite: a semester of biology or a semester of philosophy. 1 Yale College course credit(s)

Professor: Casey Dunn, Professor: Günter Wagner
Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Fall 2019
Day/Time: T 1.30-3.20

Evolutionary Ecological Genetics (E&EB 324)

Professor: Jeffrey Powell
Course Type: Undergraduate

Limnology (E&EB 325)

Limnology, the study of the physical, chemical, and biological properties of inland waters, focuses on lakes where physical (light, temperature, and mixing) and chemical (dissolved elements and compounds) properties interact with the ecology and evolution of organisms. Topics include origins and morphology of inland waters; physical and chemical properties; diversity and interactions among the organisms found in lakes; historical perspectives; and understanding conservation and management in the context of global change. Frequent field trips to local freshwater ecosystems.

Prerequisites: E&EB 220 and E&EB 225, or with permission of instructor.

Professor: David Post
Course Type: Undergraduate

Plant Structure and Function (E&EB 326)

This is an advanced botany course, preferably for students that have taken EEB 246 in addition to BIO 104; otherwise permission must be obtained from the instructor. A keen interest in plants is a must.

Professor: Erika Edwards
Course Type: Undergraduate

Laboratory for Plant Structure and Function (E&EB 327L)

This is an advanced botany course, preferably for students that have taken EEB 246 in addition to BIO 104; otherwise permission must be obtained from the instructor. A keen interest in plants is a must.

Professor: Erika Edwards
Course Type: Undergraduate

Evolution and Medicine (E&EB 335/635)

Introduction to the ways in which evolutionary science informs medical research and clinical practice. Diseases of civilization and their relation to humans’ evolutionary past; the evolution of human defense mechanisms; antibiotic resistance and virulence in pathogens; cancer as an evolutionary process. Students view course lectures on line; class time focuses on discussion of lecture topics and research papers.

Prerequisite: BIOL 101–104.

1 Yale College course credit(s)

Professor: Stephen Stearns
Course Type: Undergraduate, Course Type: Graduate
Term: Fall 2020
Day/Time: TTh 11:35am -12:50pm

Culture and Human Evolution (E&EB 336)

Examination of the origins of human modernity in the light of evolutionary and archaeological evidence. Understanding, through a merger of evolutionary reasoning with humanistic theory, the impact of human culture on natural selection across the last 250,000 years. 1 Yale College course credit(s)

Course Type: Undergraduate

Primate Diversity and Evolution (E&EB 342)

The diversity and evolutionary history of living and extinct primates. Focus on major controversies in primate systematics and evolution, including the origins and relationships of several groups. Consideration of both morphological and molecular studies. Morphological diversity and adaptations explored through museum specimens and fossil casts.

Requires Permission of the Instructor

Recommended preparation: ANTH 116.

Professor: Eric Sargis
Course Type: Undergraduate

Phylogenetic Biology (E&EB 354/654)

Phylogenetic Biology is the study of the evolutionary relationships between organisms, and the use of evolutionary relationships to understand other aspects of organism biology. This course surveys phylogenetic methods, providing a detailed picture of the statistical, mathematical, and computational tools for building phylogenies and using them to study evolution. We also examine the application of these tools to particular problems in the literature and emerging areas of study.

Prerequisites: E&EB 225 and an organismal course.
1 Yale College course credit(s)

Professor: Casey Dunn
Course Type: Undergraduate, Course Type: Graduate
Term: Fall 2020
Day/Time: TTh 11:35 am - 12:50 pm

Life History Evolution (E&EB 380)

Life history evolution studies how the phenotypic traits directly involved in reproductive success are shaped by evolution to solve ecological problems. The intimate interplay between evolution and ecology.

Requires Permission of the Instructor

After E&EB 220 and 225, or with permission of instructor.

Course Type: Undergraduate

Science of Complex Systems (E&EB 428)

Introduction to the quantitative analysis of systems with many degrees of freedom. Fundamental components in the science of complex systems, including how to simulate complex systems, how to analyze model behaviors, and how to validate models using observations. Topics include cellular automata, bifurcation theory, deterministic chaos, self-organized criticality, renormalization, and inverse theory.

Prerequisite: PHYS 301, MATH 247, or equivalent.

1 Yale College course credit(s)

Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Fall 2020
Day/Time: MWF 10:30am -11:20am

Human Osteology (E&EB 464)

A lecture and laboratory course focusing on the characteristics of the human skeleton and its use in studies of functional morphology, paleodemography, and paleopathology. Laboratories familiarize students with skeletal parts; lectures focus on the nature of bone tissue, its biomechanical modification, sexing, aging, and interpretation of lesions.

1 Yale College course credit(s)

Professor: Eric Sargis
Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Spring 2021
Day/Time: TTh 11:35am -12:50pm

Tutorial (E&EB 469)

Individual or small-group study for qualified students who wish to investigate an area of ecology or evolutionary biology not presently covered by regular courses. A student must be sponsored by a faculty member who sets requirements and meets weekly with the student. One or more written examinations and/or a term paper are required. To register, the student must submit a written plan of study approved by the faculty instructor to the director of undergraduate studies. Students are encouraged to apply during the term preceding the tutorial. Proposals must be submitted no later than the first day of the second week of the term in which the student enrolls in the tutorial. The final paper is due in the hands of the director of undergraduate studies by the last day of reading period in the term of enrollment. In special cases, with approval of the director of undergraduate studies, this course may be elected for more than one term, but only one term may be counted as an elective toward the requirements of the major. Normally, faculty sponsors must be members of the EEB department.

Requires Permission of the Instructor

http://eeb.yale.edu/sites/default/files/eeb_469_tutorial_form_rev_8.24.1…

Professor: Marta Wells
Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Spring 2020, Term: Fall 2020
Day/Time: 1 HTBA

Senior Tutorial (E&EB 470)

Tutorial for seniors in the B.A. degree program who elect a term of independent study to complete the senior requirement. A student must be sponsored by a faculty member who sets requirements and meets weekly with the student. One or more written examinations and/or a term paper are required. To register, the student must submit a written plan of study approved by the faculty instructor to the director of undergraduate studies. Students are encouraged to apply during the term preceding the tutorial. Proposals must be submitted no later than the first day of the second week of the term in which the student enrolls in the tutorial. The final paper is due in the hands of the director of undergraduate studies by the last day of reading period in the term of enrollment. Normally, faculty sponsors must be members of the EEB department.

Requires Permission of the Instructor

Enrollment limited to seniors. Fulfills the senior requirement for the B.A. degree.

http://eeb.yale.edu/sites/default/files/eeb_470_senior_tutorial_form_rev…

Professor: Marta Wells
Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Spring 2020, Term: Fall 2020
Day/Time: 1 HTBA

Research (E&EB 474)

One term of original research in an area relevant to ecology or evolutionary biology. This may involve, for example, laboratory work, fieldwork, or mathematical or computer modeling. Students may also work in areas related to environmental biology such as policy, economics, or ethics. The research project may not be a review of relevant literature but must be original. In all cases students must have a faculty sponsor who oversees the research and is responsible for the rigor of the project. Students are expected to spend ten hours per week on their research projects. Using the form available from the office of undergraduate studies or from the Classes server, students must submit a research proposal that has been approved by the faculty sponsor to the director of undergraduate studies, preferably during the term preceding the research. Proposals are due no later than the first day of the second week of the term in which the student enrolls in the course. The  final research paper is due in the hands of the of the director of of undergraduate studies by the last day of reading period in the term of enrollment.

Requires Permission of the Instructor

http://eeb.yale.edu/sites/default/files/eeb_474_research_form_rev_8.20.1…

Professor: Marta Wells
Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Spring 2020, Term: Fall 2020
Day/Time: 1 HTBA

Senior Research (E&EB 475 / E&EB 476)

One term of original research in an area relevant to ecology or evolutionary biology. This may involve, for example, laboratory work, fieldwork, or mathematical or computer modeling. Students may also work in areas related to environmental biology such as policy, economics, or ethics. The research project may not be a review of relevant literature but must be original. In all cases students must have a faculty sponsor who oversees the research and is responsible for the rigor of the project. Students are expected to spend ten hours per week on their research projects. Using the form available from the office of undergraduate studies or from the Classes server, students must submit a research proposal that has been approved by the faculty sponsor to the director of undergraduate studies, preferably during the term preceding the research. Proposals are due no later than the first day of the second week of the term in which the student enrolls in the course. The final research paper is due in the hands of the director of undergraduate studies by the last day of reading period in the term of enrollment.

Requires Permission of the Instructor

Enrollment limited to seniors. Fulfills the senior requirement for the B.S. degree.

http://eeb.yale.edu/sites/default/files/eeb_475_a_and_b_senior_research_…

Professor: Marta Wells
Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Spring 2020, Term: Fall 2020
Day/Time: 1 HTBA

Intensive Senior Research (E&EB 495 / E&EB 496)

One term of intensive original research during the senior year under the sponsorship of a Yale faculty member. Similar to other research courses except that a more substantial portion of a student?s time and effort should be spent on the research project (a minimum average of twenty hours per week). A research proposal approved by the sponsoring faculty member must be submitted to the director of undergraduate studies; forms are available from the office of undergraduate studies. For research in the fall term, approval is encouraged during the spring term of the junior year. Proposals are due no later than the first day of the second week of the term in which the student enrolls in the course. The final research paper is due in the hands of the director of undergraduate studies by the last day of reading period in the term of enrollment.

Requires Permission of the Instructor

One term of intensive research fulfills a portion of the senior requirement for the B.S. degree.

http://eeb.yale.edu/sites/default/files/eeb_495a_eeb_496b_intensive_sr_r…

Professor: Marta Wells
Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Spring 2020, Term: Fall 2020
Day/Time: 1 HTBA